Don’t Miss: Form/Unformed at the DMA

In my recent travels to Dallas, I’ve posted about the city’s electric offerings, from the Design District galleries to the world-class restaurants and boutiques.  I would be remiss in neglecting the city’s august cultural institution, the Dallas Museum of Art (widely known as the DMA).

The DMA has earned recognition as a world-class museum, and I was intrigued by their long-running design show: “Form/Unformed: Design from 1960 to the Present” running through December in the Tower Gallery.

“Veryround” chair, Louise Campbell for Zanotta (designed 2006)

The show boasts major original pieces by Verner Panton, Frank Gehry, Aldo Rossi, Zaha Hadid, Ettore Sottsass, Donald Judd, and Louise Campbell among its “historic American and European work as well as contemporary objects of international significance.”  Personally, I loved seeing the DMA’s commitment to growing a Design collection that matches Dallas’ larger-than-life ambition.

Donald Judd

Coffeepot by Zaha Hadid for Sawaya & Moroni (designed 1998)

 Verner Panton

Warren Platner

“Form/Unformed” is sponsored by TWOxTWO for AIDS and Art, an annual contemporary art auction happening this weekend at the stunning, Richard Meier-designed Rachofsky House in Dallas.

The auction is now the largest U.S. fundraiser for both amfAR and the DMA, and attracts a glittering international crowd.  So let’s just say that when it comes to art and philanthropy: don’t mess with Texas.

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Images 1- 6 courtesy Dallas Museum of Art, 7. TwoxTwo.org,  8. Onekinddesign.com

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For as long as I can remember, I’ve been fascinated by design and the subtle impact of our surroundings. Some of my earliest influences still resonate – I think of the dark woods and textured lodens of my father’s shooting club, the smell of fresh paint on a new canvas, and the bold symmetry of the Philip Johnson Glass house just down the street. For me, it was a natural path to become an Interior Designer. I love what I do. I’ve created this Journal to share my thoughts, finds and design inspirations. I hope you enjoy it!

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